A Walk Thru Santa Claus (1959)

Today is Xmas, the most wonderful time of the year: a time when everything is perfect, when all boys and girls are well behaved, when man loves his fellow man (and woman, etc, etc.), when dogs and cats snuggle together in peaceful harmony, when fruit cake is a delicious confectionary treat, the time of the year when one’s soul cannot help but sing at the beatitude of the day. Or is it the worst wonderful time of the year: a time when everything is horrible, when all boys are girls are devils, when man loathes his fellow man (and woman, etc, etc.), when dogs and cats fight viciously for dominance, when fruit cake is a chunk of disgusting, the time of the year when one crawls into the darkest of corners and prays for death?

For René Cardona it was the latter. Granted, it was the late 1950s, a simpler time all around, and Cardona was in Mexico, which was a land in an unparalleled Golden Age, all of which likely influenced Santa Claus, also known as Santa Claus vs. The Devil, to fall on the happy-go-lucky side of the spectrum. Or maybe the world really is a candy cane dream in the waning days of the year. Whichever end of the spectrum your feelings on this matter fall into join me for this month’s walk thru where I’ll be seeing if Santa Claus is naughty or nice.

You can read the rest of my, ehrm… I mean, the Doktor’s, walk thru over at The Lost Highway.

On the Good Foot: Hidden (2015)

Hidden doesn’t hold a candle to Stranger Things, but it is an entertaining movie.

Two weeks ago I watched Stranger Things. I was hooked right from the X-Filesesque opening scene. By the end of the first episode I was in love. I am a glutton have problems with my addictive behaviors. So, as a junkie eight episodes just wasn’t enough. I had to find everything the Duffer Brothers ever made. My cursory Google search uncovered Hidden and Wayward Pines. Only two! Feh! Oh well, better than nothing I supposed.

You can read my entire reaction over at Picture Show Journal.

Memories: The NeverEnding Story

The NeverEnding Story was still magical after all these years, despite being for young adults and suffering some ravages of time.

As a child I loved The NeverEnding Story. Yet, while I waited for the anniversary screening my powers of recall betrayed those memories. Namely, the specifics of the plot were vague. The more I tried to remember the more I was surprised to find that there was precious little about the story, aside from Falkor, Rockbiter, and the horse sinking in the muck, that I recalled.

You can read my entire reaction over at Picture Show Journal.

Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared-Syn

In 1979 George Miller changed the dystopian future. Before Mad Max, dystopian movies were overly cerebral sci fi with nihilistic endings—stories that made you want to shoot yourself. Suicide was not to avoid a dismal fate, but to avoid suffering another God awful movie. Now almost all dystopia are set in a desert that’s inhabited by filthy, blood-thirsty circus freaks driving metal monstrosities.

One of the many Mad Maxploitation films is Charles Band’s Metalstorm: The Destruction of Jared-Syn. I happened upon it in a carwash dollar bin. Though it was priced twice what it’s worth, I needed something for this month’s walk-thru. So, fasten your safety belts and keep a sharp lookout for roaming bands of ravagers, we’re going back to the dark times, 1983.

You can read the rest of my, ehrm… I mean, the Doktor’s, walk thru over at The Lost Highway.

Did I Stroke Out: Jason Borne (2016)

Where’d I… What just… I think I watched Jason Borne but maybe I had a stroke.

It has taken me almost a month to wrap my head around Jason Borne. No, it’s not a complicated movie. Actually it’s straight forward. My problem processing it is due to the pacing. Jason Borne is so break neck I never had a chance to get a grip. It threw my head back in my seat like a supercharged Hemi jumping off the line and never gave up. When the end credits rolled all I was left with was a blur.

You can read my entire reaction over at Picture Show Journal.